The difference between a Constitutional Republic and a Democracy.

In this video We’ll explore the difference between a Constitutional Republic and a Democracy. We’ll look at the pros and cons of each system, and see which is better for Us in éiRe. Here we have a concise explanation by G Edward Griffin of the Difference Between Democracy and a Constitutional Republic.

Unfortunately I was unable to identify this man but that does not undermine his message. If you know more about who this is leave it in the comments below.


The Constitution of Ireland of 1937 onwards, provides that Ireland (or éiRe in Irish) is the official name of the State and following the enactment of the Republic of Ireland Act of 1948, in 1949, Ireland became a Republic, At least by name, Its up to its People to enact a Republic not a Government or a Political Party.

I was lead to believe this whole State was kicked off with Poblacht na hÉireann? Hundreds of years of failed rebellions then we got organised and failed a few more times then got a foot in the door and have being striving toward the requirements of the Individual for the common good ever since… I’m not sure I believe that anymore.

Poblacht na hÉireann

IRISHMEN AND IRISHWOMEN: In the name of God and of the dead generations from which she receives her old tradition of nationhood, Ireland, through us, summons her children to her flag and strikes for her freedom.

Having organised and trained her manhood through her secret revolutionary organisation, the Irish Republican Brotherhood, and through her open military organisations, the Irish Volunteers and the Irish Citizen Army, having patiently perfected her discipline, having resolutely waited for the right moment to reveal itself, she now seizes that moment, and, supported by her exiled children in America and by gallant allies in Europe, but relying in the first on her own strength, she strikes in full confidence of victory.

We declare the right of the people of Ireland to the ownership of Ireland, and to the unfettered control of Irish destinies, to be sovereign and indefeasible. The long usurpation of that right by a foreign people and government has not extinguished the right, nor can it ever be extinguished except by the destruction of the Irish people. In every generation the Irish people have asserted their right to national freedom and sovereignty; six times during the past three hundred years they have asserted it in arms. Standing on that fundamental right and again asserting it in arms in the face of the world, we hereby proclaim the Irish Republic as a Sovereign Independent State, and we pledge our lives and the lives of our comrades-in-arms to the cause of its freedom, of its welfare, and of its exaltation among the nations.


The Irish Republic is entitled to, and hereby claims, the allegiance of every Irishman and Irishwoman. The Republic guarantees religious and civil liberty, equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens, and declares its resolve to pursue the happiness and prosperity of the whole nation and of all its parts, cherishing all the children of the nation equally and oblivious of the differences carefully fostered by an alien government, which have divided a minority from the majority in the past.

Until our arms have brought the opportune moment for the establishment of a permanent National Government representative of the whole people of Ireland and elected by the suffrages of all her men and women, the Provisional Government, hereby constituted, will administer the civil and military affairs of the Republic in trust for the people.

We place the cause of the Irish Republic under the protection of the Most High God. Whose blessing we invoke upon our arms, and we pray that no one who serves that cause will dishonour it by cowardice, inhumanity, or rapine. In this supreme hour the Irish nation must, by its valour and discipline and by the readiness of its children to sacrifice themselves for the common good, prove itself worthy of the august destiny to which it is called.

From Department of the Taoiseach 

Published on 19 November 2018

Last updated on 19 November 2018

Its all very 18th century, but the sentiment holds up… Alien Government, Fight for National and personal Sovereignty and guarantees religious and civil liberty, equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens, and declares its resolve to pursue the happiness and prosperity of the whole nation and of all its parts, cherishing all the children of the nation equally

It declares the right of the People of Ireland to the ownership of Ireland, and to the unfettered control of Irish destinies, to be sovereign and indefeasible. The long usurpation of that right by a foreign people and government has not extinguished the right.

We place the cause of the Irish Republic under the protection of the Most High God. Whose blessing we invoke upon our arms, and we pray that no one who serves that cause will dishonour it by cowardice, inhumanity, or rapine. In this supreme hour the Irish Nation must, by its valour and discipline and by the readiness of its children to sacrifice themselves for the common good, prove itself worthy of the august destiny to which it is called…

Do you not feel that way 100+ years later? Is the common good not defined in the document? We the People are losing sight of what our collective goal is and who (historically) the enemy of the People are.

Is this not the very reason we keep Oliver Plunkett’s Head Jar in Drogheda,

Oliver Plunkett, a 17th-century Irish martyr, became Ireland’s first new saint in nearly 700 years after being canonized in 1975. In 1997, he was deemed the country’s patron saint for peace and reconciliation.

Oliver Plunkett became a Catholic priest in the 1650s, during the turbulent aftermath of the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland, which saw the persecution and execution of Roman Catholic clergy. Despite the prolific anti-Catholic sentiment, he was still able to found a Jesuit college???

Plunkett was found guilty of high treason and sentenced to death. As was customary for those accused of high treason (AT the time), he was brutally hanged, drawn, and quartered on July 1, 1681.

Plunkett’s various body parts were buried in the courtyard at Saint Giles-in-the-Fields, though they were exhumed a couple years later. After spending brief stints in Rome and elsewhere in Ireland, his head arrived in Drogheda in 1929, where it has remained and we have send bus loads of school children to view this severed head ever since.

Is this how it has to go before the elite wake up to how it will inevitably end. I for one would much rather we find and amicable resolve but unfortunately history strongly implies drastic actions will have to take place before the Natural Right of all Peoples are to be granted by any Government Global or National that’s why the Irish State is a Constitutional Republic and they know We the People don’t want a Hall of Presidents. So they over exercise the Democracy part then claim You fucked it up and they need more power.

Let us avoid the Hall of Politicians. It is Our Republic, If we can keep it.

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